Students donate blood on campus

Evonne Ermey

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The San Diego Bloodmobile, painted in gradating hues of purple green and yellow, took residence in Gorton Quad Jan 27 inviting City students to step inside and donate blood for the greater good.

The Bloodmobile saw a steady flow of traffic from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. rotating the student body from the folding chairs outside, where they patiently filled out paperwork, to the beds inside where the donation took place.

Adam Sitcoscy, an International business major, was one of many waiting patiently outside for his turn to donate.
“I saw the truck and I have the time so I figured why not” He said while casually nibbling a Nutter Butter. “It’s for a good cause. It helps people, saves lives,” he said.
Although the San Diego Blood Bank has seven fixed collection sites in the area more than half of the blood donated is received through the Bloodmobile.

“It’s more convenient for us to come to [donors]” explained Registered Nurse Joanne Kaplan.

All of the blood donated to the Blood Mobile goes back into the San Diego community. Recipients of the blood vary. Some are trauma patients who are treated for emergency injury, but other recipients, like cancer patients, must return week after week for transfusions.

Medical assistant Veronica Badilla has been working on the bloodmobile for almost three years and has assisted in almost 500 blood drives.

“It’s very nice. We don’t have to sit in an office everyday and it’s nice to know that what your doing is helping an entire community.” She says before launching into the ins and outs of the procedure.

“Everyone is different, but usually we explain the process to them and then we take their blood pressure and test for Iron. The actual draw takes from five to ten minutes. It’s a little bit of a stick and a sting. I’ve heard it’s like a bee sting, but I’ve never been stung by a bee so I don’t really know. Give it a try. The first time is always the hardest. A lot of people think its scary bit it’s not. It’s really a breeze.”

Although blood donors are greatly needed, there are circumstances under which people cannot donate. If you have traveled to China, Costa Rico, or certain areas in Mexico or Iraq you must wait one year to donate.

Recent illness, symptoms of illness, high blood pressure or low Iron levels can also interrupt the donation process.

The San Diego Bloodmobile visits the City Campus once a month. Each draw results in 1 pint of blood for persons in need and takes approximately 40 min. More information can be found at SanDiegoBloodBank.org.

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