City Times

Purchasers are not to blame

William Morse

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As the holidays are approaching, so are the overwhelming feelings of consumerism, as everyone goes sale-crazy and buys everything in sight.

For anyone who happens to work in retail or any service that works face to face with customers, they may have heard the phrase “The customer is always right.” Be it from a manager or a parent or anyone else: This is completely right.

Some may strongly disagree with this motto, but it’s true. To create revenue, a company needs money from the customers.

It can sometimes be hard to keep a level head with some of the more “difficult” people. When faced in this situation it’s always important to remember that, “Yes, the customer is always right.”

It’s vital to earn money for the company to secure future employment there and hey, maybe there will even be a pay raise for being so passive and not aggressive when it comes to difficult customers.

That last situation was theoretical of course, but the fact that the holidays seem to make people dehumanize employees of these work forces is still upsetting. There is always a better way around it then calling the person a jerk, or any other select words to come up with.

As an employee of a fine establishment, one should always have a mentality to put the customer first. That’s why he or she is working there anyways, because of their “amazing people skills” or is a “people pleaser.”

If these workers weren’t expecting at least one or two jerks in their work place then why would they apply there? Why not somewhere with less human interaction?

Really, this phrase wasn’t meant for what it is to be used today. it was really just a saying to make customers feel special, not about letting them go on and on about something trivial.

This phrase was created not only for the customer, but for the employees’ outlook on the company. In general, if you have a good attitude about your customer service, chances are that you’ll have the same feeling towards your place of employment.

There’s no need to be the kind of person who comes to work with a more than overly sunny disposition, granted that’s just creepy, but make the customer feel special. If they babble on about something small or trivial, nod and act interested.

They are shopping in your place of employment; make them feel special because yes, “the customer is always right.”

So long as they are spending money, they are the most special person of all, so then make them feel that way. The last thing they want to do is come in and deal with someone who gets them annoyed and makes them complain to the manager, people don’t go out of their way to do that, it’s just pointless.

When it comes to customer service, yes, they may not be the brightest, but they are always right.

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Purchasers are not to blame